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Y’ii Jing Jing

Y’ii Jing Jing means to release tension in the tendons and ligaments.

There are 13 forms in this set of exercises. Forms 1-10 are the main body of practices and forms 11-13 are the concluding movements. (You may find it useful to warmup with the 9 Joints first.)

Practice each of the forms 1-10 the same number of times, starting with 3 or 4 times for each form, then gradually increasing the number of practices to as many as you wish (5, 7, 10, even 20-30). Increasing the repetitions (if quality is maintained) builds strength in the tendons, ligaments, and muscles. It is very important, however, to not stop and rest — dropping your hands or the positions — until you have completed the whole set of movements. Therefore, start with a number of repetitions that your are able to complete without overly tiring yourself.

Relax your body and breathe naturally throughout. Set your vision straight ahead (without focussing on any particular visual object) and place all your energy into your hands, especially the centers of the palms. Clear your mind and disentangle from the sense doors. When moving the hands, your attention should focus on the centers of the palms.

Forms 11-13 are to be completed as one series at the end of the exercises. Each movement within Forms 11 – 13 is done only once. Follow the breathing instructions for the transitions into forms 4, 9, 10, and while performing the closing forms 11-13.

Forms 1-5 and 7-8 involve a sudden clenching of the hands in various ways. This should be as sudden and strong as you can do. Then release the clench or grip after a second or two; do not hold it for long.

In forms 2, 3, 5, 6, 7... the hands and arms remain pretty much in the same plane as the rest of the body, rather than drifting out in front of you.

In forms 1-10, after each clenching or effortful movement, fully relax not only the hands and arms, but the whole body, before repeating the clenching or movement. Whole-body mindfulness checks for tension throughout the body and relaxes it. The alteration between sudden, strong clenching and fully relaxing gives the most benefits.

Form 2 is the only instance when the thumbs are wrapped within the fists. In all other forms involving fists, the thumbs are outside.

The breathing is important when there are specific instructions. The rest of the time, simply breathe comfortably and naturally without controlling the breathing. Most of the forms are not coordinated with the breathing. Do not hold your breath.

Posture Preparation:

Stand upright with your feet shoulder width apart and slide your heels apart so that your toes are slightly inverted (pigeon toed) in order to give a firm, stable stance. Gather your awareness to the whole body and don’t let attention stray to the other sense doors.

Form 1:

a. Relax your body with your arms down at your side.

b. Raise your forearms and hands (palms down) until they are at the level of your solar plexus. Then, pull your elbows back so the hands are drawn back to your sides, with palms downward and the wrists bending to a right angle.

c. Push the palms down with full force quickly towards the ground, with the fingers pointing forward, then relax fully.

d. Repeat the exercise the intended number of practices.

Form 2:

a. Relax your body with your arms down at your side.

b. Raise your hands by extending the elbows slightly outward until the hands are beside your hips. Make fists with thumbs pointing towards your hips (close to the hip socket but not touching your clothing).

c. With your energy flowing down from the shoulders through the arms, stretch your thumbs towards the hips as far and strongly as you can, and clench your fingers into a (thumbless) fist, then relax. The energy flows down the arms and through the thumbs into the hip socket (which is considered an energy reservoir). When relaxing, maintain the shoulder position.

d. Repeat the exercise the intended number of practices.

Form 3:

a. Relax your body with your arms down at your side.

b. Fold your thumbs inside your fingers.

c. Grasp your fits and squeeze your thumbs tightly with full force, then relax the whole body.

d. Repeat the exercise the intended number of practices.

Form 4:

a. [Transition] Taking a deep inhalation, bring your hands (in loose fists) together (with palms facing each other) in front of you and raise them up till they are level with your nostrils. While exhaling, relax your hands and arms, keeping your hands close, but do not rest your arms on your chest or have your hands touch any part of your body.

b. With normal breathing, squeeze the fists with full force, pressing the two arms (from wrists to forearms to elbows) tightly together, as well as pulling them up against your body in a strong hug, then relax fully throughout the body.

c. Repeat the exercise the intended number of practices.

Form 5:

a. Slowly raise your arms straight up and above your head.

b. Squeeze your hands into fists with full force, and relax.

c. Repeat the exercise the intended number of practices.

Form 6:

a. Lower the hands (loose fists) till the are just below your chin with the knuckles touching and palms outward. Your elbows should be sticking out to the sides.

b. Clench your fists tightly and pull them apart (not too fast) as if opening “sliding doors,” then relax. (Pull the fists straight towards the sides instead of “back,” dropping the elbows down.)

c. Repeat the exercise the intended number of practices.

Form 7:

a. Extend your arms straight out from your shoulders, with wrists and fingers dangling loosely.

b. Circle your wrists, gathering your hands into fists and squeeze with full force, pushing out simultaneously, and fully extending the arms, then relax fully, transcending all tension, with wrists and fingers loose again.

c. Repeat the exercise the intended number of practices.

Form 8:

a. Extend your arms straight ahead, with wrists and fingers dangling loosely.

b. Circle your wrists, gathering your hands into fists, squeezing them with full force and pushing forward simultaneously, then relax fully, transcending all tension, with wrists and fingers loose again.

c. Repeat the exercise the intended number of practices.

Form 9:

a. [Transition] Position your hands right next to your ears.

b. Raise your arms straight up and form fists. Pull your arms & fists down “strongly” to your ears (back to position in “a”). While lowering your arms, press your feet hard against the ground. Relax once your fists reach your ears. Then, let your hands slowly drift upward above your head whenever you like.

c. Repeat the exercise the intended number of practices.

Form 10:

a. [Transition] Breathing in, bring the knuckles of each fist together (so that palms face downward, grip relaxed) in front of your mouth. Continuing the inhalation deep into the belly (below the navel), lower the hands (knuckles together, palms down) to your navel. As you bring your knuckles together, collect all the saliva in your mouth, then swallow it as your hands lower to below the navel.

b. Breathing out, continue lowering the hands (relaxed fists), gradually bend forward until the open hands dangle between your legs with the back of the hands facing each other. Bend only as far as is comfortable. (*The speed at which you bend your body should be the same as that when you swallowed your saliva.)

c. With the back of your hands together, squeeze your fists with full force, and relax.

d. Bending forward with the head dangling brings blood to the brain, which is refreshing and invigorating.

e. Stay bent forward and repeat only the fist compressions the intended number of practices.

Form 11 (beginning of closing series):

At the end of form 10, open your hands with palms up and finger tips barely touching as if you’re holding a ball. Inhale deeply and gradually raise your hands until they reach your upper chest, gradually straightening your body as you do so. Turn your hands so that the palms face outwards and, while exhaling fully, simultaneously, extend your hands forward and sweep them outward (at chest level). Circle your arms quickly towards your back, bending forward at a 45 degree angle, and slap your open palms onto the kidney area of your back with full force as you complete the exhalation. (*This is all one continuous movement. )

(The movements of form 11-13 should be in unison with your breathing. They should not be speedy movements.)

Form 12:

After completing form 11, pinch your thumbs against your fingers and straighten up. Shift the pinched fingers to your sides and hook your wrists like the arms of a praying mantis, with fingers pointing downward. Inhaling, pull your hands up under your armpits and, at the same time, bend your knees slightly to flex them like a spring, until the finger tips reach the joint of the armpit. Exhaling suddenly, open your hands and push them outward while jumping forward like a frog. Imagine your hand push is blasting away a large rock in front of you. (*This is all one continuous movement.)

Form 13:

Upon completing form 12, without pausing, while inhaling, scoop your open hands up and in towards your upper chest, straightening your body as you do. As your hands approach your chest, the palms face downward with finger tips almost touching. Exhaling, gently lower the hands down along the body as if settling all your energy and mind in your hara (lower abdomen). Relax fully. Again, relax fully. Relax fully a third time.

Conclusion:

This completes the set. Now is a good time to meditate.